For over 25 years Hessilhead has cared for Scotland's injured and orphaned wildlife, aiming to rescue, treat, rehabilitate and release birds and animals back to the wild

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CARING FOR SCOTLAND'S SICK, INJURED AND ORPHANED WILDLIFE

July 2nd 2014

I hope  no-one thinks that just because there have been no diary updates recently, that nothing has been happening at the Centre. Far from it. One of the reasons for no new posts is that we admitted 798 wildlife casualties in June. As most of these are orphans, demanding lots of time, we were busy. Most of these new casualties are preceeded by a phone call, and there were lots of other calls for advice. Then there is the time taken to admit each new bird or animal, with a little time taken to chat with the kind and caring people who brought them in. Add to that an Open Day, and I hope you will understand.

So July has begun with a pretty busy centre. Hardly an empty aviary or enclosure, though there are youngsters ready for release most days, but others ready to move out of the hospital. Most of the hospital cages are full too, with new arrivals in boxes on heat pads. As well as feeding all the dependent patients every day, new arrivals must be assessed and treatment prescribed.

23 new arrivals today, including 3 orphan hoglets, luckily old enough to feed themselves. 3 baby rabbits, eyes still closed, 2 bats, 1 tiny weasel, a few young gull chicks, a juv pied wagtail, magpies, a house sparrow, a late starling fledgling and a swallow chick.  When swallow and house martin chicks start to come in quantity, it seems like the beginning of the end of the busy season. Yesterday 3 house martin chciks were resscued after their nest collapsed, and one that arrived alone has settled in with them.

A young roe deer is reluctant to take milk from a bottle, so this evening we have left it with a choice of fresh vegetation, a bowl of goat’s milk and a bowl of water. It will be better if it feeds itself. We are worried about this deer, as it doesn’t seem to see. It could be concussed, as it was found at the roadside, but seems quite fit and alert in other ways.

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         The new baby weasel

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