For over 25 years Hessilhead has cared for Scotland's injured and orphaned wildlife, aiming to rescue, treat, rehabilitate and release birds and animals back to the wild

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CARING FOR SCOTLAND'S SICK, INJURED AND ORPHANED WILDLIFE

January 30th 2014

The past few weeks have been surprisingly busy. The seals take a lot of time each day, but we can see results now with all but one of the grey seals feeding themselves. All these self feeders are in outdoor pools and enjoying the extra space. Stenna, the little common seal pup is eating well and growing too. This week a new common seal pup was sent from Arran. He is underweight, probably due to parasites, but will hopefully respond well to treatment. The downside to having all these seal pups is that our daily fish bill is now in excess of ¬£100. So if anyone would like to contribute or or organize some fund-raising to help with thDSC_8701 (2) - Copyese costs, we’d be grateful.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Swans have been arriving at the hospital regularly. All 6 mute swans admitted in the past 3 weeks have made good progress. One swan that collided with wires near Dalrymple made slow but steady progress and is now able to walk. EWe hear that her mate is waiting for her, so hopefully she’ll be returning home soon.

A whooper swan looked very sad when it was brought in from Hogganfield Loch. It had resisted capture, despite being poorly for two weeks. It made a rapid recovery on antibiotic treatment, and is now in our large wildfowl enclosure. Soon it will be back at Hogganfield.

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At this time of year most of the casualties are accident victims, and inevitably some of them are too badly injured to survive, or return to the wild. Sadly we have put to sleep rta roe deer, a guillemot with a badly broken wing and a blackbird that had been tangled in netting and snapped its leg.

On a brighter note a black headed gull recovered well after being found hanging from a bush, tangled in line. Herring gulls have made good recoveries too, and we have guillemot and kittiwake ready for release.

An unusual patient is a red pigeon!. This poor bird arrived covered in wood preservative. Of course we can’t wash this off. Water is repelled from the feathers, just as it is from DSC_8684 - Copya ¬†wooden fence.

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